Demonstrative Adjectives & Pronouns in Spanish – When to Use & What are the differences?

Today let’s back peddle a tad to a more basic topic in Spanish grammar – Demonstrative Adjectives and Demonstrative Pronouns.  You will learn when to use them, how to differentiate them from each other.  The words themselves seem very similar, so pay visual attention to the word-endings, and things will start to make sense as you improve your Spanish skills.

Demonstrative Adjectives

Demonstrative adjectives are simply words that “point” to something else, and in English are words; this/these, and that/those. They precede the nouns they modify and agree with them in gender (masculine or feminine) and number (singular or plural).

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The Passive Voice in Spanish

Spanish, like English, has an active and a passive voice. In the active voice, the subject generally performs some action. In the passive voice, the subject is acted upon.

Notice the difference between active and passive voice Spanish sentence constructions:

  • El chef preparó la comida.The chef prepared the meal. (active)
  • La comida fue preparada por el chef.The meal was prepared by the chef. (passive)
  • Los niños hacen los dibujos.The children make drawings. (active)
  • Los dibujos son hechos por los niños. – The drawings are made ​​by children (passive)
  • Los arquitectos construirán el edificio.The architects will construct the building. (active)
  • El edificio será construido por los arquitectos.The building will be constructed by the architects. (passive)

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REFLEXIVE VERBS in Spanish -Flex some Spanish Muscle!

Not the favorite topic of Spanish students, especially coming from a language without a common equivalent – Reflexive verbs are indeed an important grammatical topic to get your head around pretty early on.

Reflexive verbs are simply when the subject of the verb is also its object.   What does this mean?  Let’s start off slow and work our way forward with some easy examples.

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A reflexive verb requires a reflexive personal pronoun, and these are:

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